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Volume Four: Issue Four

ARTICLES

Translation Challenges and Strategies: The ASL Translation of a Computer-Based, Psychiatric Diagnostic Interview

Louise A. Montoya, Reginald Egnatovitch, Elizabeth Eckhardt, Marjorie Goldstein, Richard A. Goldstein, and Annie G. Steinberg

Comprehension of Sign Language Interpreting: Deciphering a Complex Task Situation

Marc Marschark, Patricia Sapere, Carol Convertino, Rosemarie Seewagen, and Heather Maltzen

Sign Language Interpreting: The Relationship between Metalinguistic Awareness and the Production of Interpreting Omissions

Jemina Napier and Roz Barker

BOOK REVIEWS

Ray Jackendoff, Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution

Karen Emmorey

Gary Morgan and Bencie Woll, eds., Sign Language Research Contributes to a Better Understanding of Language Acquisition, A Review of Directions in Sign Language Acquisition

Charlotte Evans
ABSTRACTS
Translation Challenges and Strategies: The ASL Translation of a Computer-Based, Psychiatric Diagnostic Interview

This article describes the translation goals, challenges, strategies, and solutions employed in the development of a computer-based, self-administered, psychiatric diagnostic instrument, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for the Deaf (D-DIS-IV) in American Sign Language (ASL) with English captions. The article analyzes the impact of the differences between ASL and English as well as the influence upon psychiatric content of the life experiences of respondents with normal hearing and deafness. The authors describe solutions for bridging these differences in the translation of a self-administered, computer-based, psychiatric diagnostic interview.

Comprehension of Sign Language Interpreting: Deciphering a Complex Task Situation

Remarkably few studies have examined the outcomes of sign language interpreting. Three experiments reported here examine deaf students’ comprehension of interpreting in American Sign Language and English-based signing (transliteration) as a function of their sign language skills and preferences. In Experiments 1 and 2, groups of deaf students varying in their sign language skills viewed either an ASL or English-based interpretation of a nontechnical lecture, followed by either a written comprehension test (Experiment 1) or a signed comprehension test (Experiment 2). Experiment 3 involved a more technical (physics) lecture, separate testing of students with greater ASL or English-based sign skills and preferences, and control of students’ prior content knowledge. Results consistently demonstrate that regardless of the deaf students’ reported sign language skills and preferences, they were equally competent in comprehending ASL interpreting and English transliteration, but they gained less knowledge from lectures than hearing peers in comparison groups. The results raise questions about how much deaf students actually learn in interpreted classrooms and the link between their communication preferences and learning.

Sign Language Interpreting: The Relationship between Metalinguistic Awareness and the Production of Interpreting Omissions

This article presents the findings of the first linguistic analysis of sign language interpreting carried out in Australia. A study was conducted on ten Australian Sign Language/English interpreters to determine the rate and occurrence of interpreting omissions and the interpreters’ level of metalinguistic awareness in relation to their production of interpreting omissions. After videotaping interpretations, analyzing the interpreters’ output, and conducting postinterpreting task reviews and retrospective interviews, the authors report that all the interpreters appeared to have high levels of metalinguistic awareness with regard to their production of interpreting omissions. This finding led to the definition of five categories of interpreting omissions: conscious strategic, conscious intentional, conscious unintentional, conscious receptive, and unconscious omissions. The findings of this study can be applied in the education of signed and spoken interpreters not only in Australia but also worldwide.