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American Annals of the Deaf

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Attitudes, Innuendo, and Regulators: Challenges of Interpretation

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TABLE I. Outline of Innuendo

Verbal Parody

Innuendo
1. The intentional representation of the object of parody 1. The deliberate insinuation
2. The flaunting of the verbal representation 2. The flaunting of the verbal implication
3. The critical act 3. The critical act
4. The comic act 4. The comic act

 

 

TABLE 2. Descriptions of Humor by Discipline

Discipline

Description Author
Sociology Frame shifting Goffman
  Discontinuity or bisociation Fine
Contextual Semantics Script overlap & Incongruity Raskin
Semantics Incongruity-Resolution Pepicello & Weisberg
Cognitive Psychology Incongruity Resolution Suls

 

 

TABLE 3. Focus for Understanding Innuendo

Discipline

Description Author
Anthropology Contextualization Cues Gumperz
Ethnography of Communication Communicative Competence Hymes
Pragmatics Speaker’s Meaning Grice

 

 

TABLE 4. Possible Outcomes of Face-Threatening Acts

Speaker’s Intention

Hearer’s Interpretation Speaker’s Expectation Hearer’s Expectation
Meaning offense Taking offense Insult Insult
Meaning offense Not taking offense Insult Amusement
Not meaning offense Taking offense Amusement Insult
Not meaning offense Not taking offense Amusement Amusement

 

 

 

 

 

Text Box: Ending as predicted?
Text Box:  Story   set-up
Text Box: Prediction
Text Box: No surprise, no laughter
Text Box: Surprise
Text Box: Find rule that makes ending follow from preceding material.
Text Box: Rule found?
Text Box: Laughter
Text Box: Puzzlement
Text Box: Yes
Text Box: No
Text Box: Yes
Text Box: No

 

 

 

 

 

 

The notion of the “professional educational interpreter” must be introduced into this discussion to help us view the bigger picture. Mills (1996) states that educational interpreters are professionals. This statement sounds plausible but, in fact, is not based on empirical evidence. We simply do not know about 50 percent of the K–12 educational interpreter workforce and, because no uniform standards exist, we cannot say with certainty how many professional K–12 educational interpreters exist. The term professional means “conforming to the rules or standards of a profession (Webster’s 1996, 1998) and one who “possesses distinctive qualifications” (WorldNet 1.6 1997).

 

 

 

 

Text Box: Ending as predicted?
Text Box: Story set-up
Text Box: Prediction
Text Box: No surprise,
no laughter
Text Box:    Surprise
Text Box: Find rule that makes ending follow from preceding material.
Text Box: Rule found?
Text Box: Laughter
Text Box: Puzzlement
Text Box: Yes
Text Box:  No
Text Box: Yes
Text Box: No

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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